Traditions of the Nordic Völva- Samantha Catalina Sinclair

https://www.academia.edu/1617364/Traditions_of_the_Nordic_V%C3%B6lva My highlights: also yes, copy paste screws up the reference numbers As I continued to research genealogy on our distaff[1] side –an old English saying for  ‘mother’s side of the family,[1] Merriam-Webster. "Distaff - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary." Dictionary and Thesaurus - Merriam-Webster Online. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/distaff (accessed April 12, 2011). [1] … Continue reading Traditions of the Nordic Völva- Samantha Catalina Sinclair

The seeresses of the Viking period

https://en.natmus.dk/historical-knowledge/denmark/prehistoric-period-until-1050-ad/the-viking-age/religion-magic-death-and-rituals/viking-seeresses/ Henbane is one of Denmark's most poisonous plants. Photo: Bjoerntvedt. Völuspá:The prophecy of the seeress Seeresses possessed such strong powers that even the king of the gods, Odin, could benefit from their help and advice. In “Völuspá:The prophecy of the seeress” – a  poem from the Elder Edda – an old man visits a seeress, … Continue reading The seeresses of the Viking period

Völva Staffs

Seiðstaffs of the Völur Max Dashu http://www.suppressedhistories.net/articles2/volur.html These iron staffs were all found in Norse female burials, mostly from Sweden, Norway, and Denmark, 800-1000 CE. Archaeologists originally interpreted them as "cooking spits" or measuring tools, and even now continue to be described as "handles," "baskets," or with elaborate descriptions of their structure. However, they bear … Continue reading Völva Staffs